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the debt ceiling ultimately unless they get severe spending cuts and the obama administration is not going to give it to them. you're going to watch the u.s. do crazy, crazy things this year. >> he was pretty clear. he called it crazy. i talked to eric cantor earlier, the republican majority leader. he sort of said we're ready to deal and compromise, but people are very worried about what the u.s. could do. >> oh, and this latest decision to just kick the can, i hate to use the cliche, further down the road, axel neighbor is a former central banker in europe, also the head of ubs and he was absolutely in no doubt that what we are seeing in the u.s. in the political and economic process is dangerous. >> if you have the debt ceiling, the europeans will talk about how you can make that binding. in the u.s., the concern is much more whether you can lift it in time in order not to put too much break on the economy. now, the u.s. economy has bottomed out, it's coming back, and i think sooner or later the u.s. has to face the fiscal issue not just in the sense of delaying adjustment but really ma
with this sequester-related cuts on march 1st. the expiration of the cr at the end of march and then the debt ceiling may 1st i believe. so a lot of looming fiscal deadlines will be the next big thing. >> bill: if republicans agreed not to push for the massive spending cuts to social security and medicare for -- as a price for increasing the debt ceiling they're going to come back, right, with those same demands. at the next round. >> i don't think those demands are going away. part of the point of the short-term debt ceiling extension just passed last week was sort of to try and leverage their position in the sequester-related discussion of $1.2 trillion of autoic spending cuts set to kick in on march 1st which are delayed two months with the fiscal cliff deal. they're hoping to extract spending cuts from president obama. if not that fight, then in the next debt ceiling fight the next debt ceiling fight. the demand nor spending cuts isn't going to go anywhere. >> bill: barney frank, he would be fired up, ready to go. he knows she is issues. he knows the fiscal issues better than anybody else. >> dev
congress voted to suspend the debt ceiling for three months this week, effectively raising the country's borrowing limit while they figure out deeper cuts to reduce the deficit. that keeps me employed for at least a few more months. even before that deadline hits again, march 1st will be on us, the so-called sequester deadline. that's a stupid washington name for a stupid and dangerous washington creation, the automatic across-the-board spending cuts. then there's another date to worry about, april 15th. not just tax filing day but the date by which congress has promised to adopt a budget resolution. they even this time stake their pay on it, agreeing to reach a deal or face suspension of their paychecks until they reach a deal. that might just be enough of a carrot to make them actually present a budget that takes on our a bah looning deficit. but that battle may make the recent battle over tax hikes for the rich seem like a friendly game of badminton. big spending cuts are needed and they will hit americans where it hurts -- in their entitlements. i'm talking about health
as obama was elected are going to cross their arms and they are not going to raise the debt ceiling ultimately unless they get severe spending cuts and the obama administration is not going to give it to them. and you are going to watch the u.s. do crazy, crazy things this year. >> if you are right on those crazy, crazy things, then the rest of us are in for a dreadful, dread full time? >> dreadful. it is going to be so strange for the richest country on earth to cross their arms and say i'm not paying. imagine crossing your arms. you are going to see it this year. >> reporter: now, we have been asking our guests here for the riskometer. on this side we have is the u.s. a bigger threat to global growth in 2013. on this side the e.u. lutnic thinks the u.s. is by far the bigger. as you look overall most people still seem to believe europe is the biggest threat in 2013. by the way, speet tweet me wher think the biggest threat is. >> very official looking. did you make that yourself? >> don't you mock it? it works and it is doing a good job. >> we will have people tweet you and see what
at the debt ceiling. which one of those, to you as a business leader, matters the most, affects business the most? >> i think, um, what matters the most is providing clarity. clarity to business, clarity to the country at large. and that's what people want. every time there's a survey, you see that they want clarity. and that's why i think it is so important to have a solution. liz: well, now you know you have clarity on the fact that people have the payroll tax back into their paychecks. >> sure. liz: are you seeing any effect on that where people have less money in their pockets, and maybe they're not buying coca-cola as much? >> well, i think generally speaking we still see great opportunities in the united states for our business in the coming decade and continuing on from there. we haven't seen an impact yet. it's too early to tell. liz: okay. >> but i would say this, um, i would say if we can have a solution -- which i believe we will -- for fiscal reform, if we can have a solution in the united states for tax reform to get a 21st century tax policy in place that we can all be prou
with the debt ceiling. so the sequester is the next thing that republicans -- >> yes, sequester and the budget. and, i don't know what richard things, but my view was -- >> hasn't been a budget in four years -- >> there has been a budget. not a stand-alone budget. they just keep continuing the budget that already exists. >> is that a problem? >> it can be a problem. >> how do you -- >> i think it was -- i blame partisanship in washington. i don't think that's any one person's fault by any means. i think not making the fight about the debt ceiling, which has the unfortunate downside that if you mess it up, the u.s. government defaults, and it's a financial catastrophe, this was a sign of maturity. i think on the republicans' part that let's make it about the budget. so the budget is now going to come to so-called continuing resolution. they're going to have to have a fight about a government shutdown. this is what they should be arguing about. what does the government spend money on? what should it spend money on? how much revenue should be coming in? let's make the argument about that, not abo
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)